Exhibit - 19th Century Landscaping at Two National Home Campuses - VA History Office
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VA History Office

 

Exhibit - 19th Century Landscaping at Two National Home Campuses

Landscaping and Architecture at the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers: A Comparison of Sawtelle and Dayton

Landscaping at National Homes

The branches of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers built after the Civil War were all designed like military installations, with the residents - the Veterans - centrally located and other amenities nearby. These facilities were also considered possible attractive destinations for tourists, bringing attention to Veterans and their prior service. At these branches, landscaping was an essential element to increase the natural beauty of the sprawling campuses. 

In this exhibit (click above), experience and learn how the landscaping from the 19th Century was designed. Some of the features were practical in nature, such as to provide food and irrigation for the residents. But it all was integrated to maximize the National Homes natural environment for the Veterans.  


By Parker Beverly, VA History Office intern and Wake Forest undergraduate student

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